Helping young people process the Christchurch tragedy

Kia Ora Whanau

Friday the 15th of March was a very sad day in our nation. Many of us are struggling even to know where to start in processing the brutal murder of so many of our Muslim neighbours.

We have put together this simple resource to help you and parents to help support your young people in the wake of this national tragedy.

Some important things to keep in mind:

  1. This event will affect people in different ways, be prepared to be sensitive and responsive to the different questions and needs that arise from your young people
  2. Create a safe place for young people to think and ask anything – no comment or question is too silly
  3. Channel young people’s negative energy and emotions towards some simple positive actions
  4. Be aware of the possible triggering that such an event can be for some of our young people who are struggling with mental health challenges such as anxiety, depression and suicidality
  5. Support young people’s parents and pass this info onto them

The ideas unpacked:

Helping young people process the event

The most helpful thing you can do in light of the Christchurch shootings is to create a safe space for young people to process what has happened.

Here is a great article from The Parenting Place that gives some great insight into have such a conversation. https://www.theparentingplace.com/how-to-talk-about/world-trauma/?fbclid=IwAR2iNya1ZKyFTJGxdWRKNkBKEa563xrmGmlnNqwlyX_cw271lHy2JTlUJVs

Consider using some psalms of lament to help provide a pathway for healthy grieving for young people. Psalms 10, 46, 57, 86 or 61 could be helpful places to start here.

 

Help young people make some simple positive actions in their grief

In the wake of tragic and sad events we all need to work through a barrage of negative emotions which include sadness and anger and fear. One of most helpful things that you can do for your young people is create some opportunities for them to channel this negative emotional energy into some positive avenues. This article from the spinoff shares some excellent ways that your young people can individually or collectively do some simple actions that can make a real difference for those who are closest to the tragedy that has unfolded https://thespinoff.co.nz/news/16-03-2019/christchurch-terror-attack-how-to-support-nzs-muslim-communities/

Looking out for signs and symptoms in our most vulnerable young people

For some people tragic events like this can trigger a very negative spiral of thinking which can lead to greater levels of depression, anxiety and even suicidality. The best thing we can do here is to create a space for young people to express how they are feeling and to be straight up with them if we have any concerns for their safety. Zeal has produced an excellent and simple resource to help guide you and parents through a conversation if there is any concern about a young person’s mental health post this event. https://zeal.nz/blog/supporting-each-other-through-13-reasons-why-a-youth-workers-perspective

Understanding Islam and how it relates to the Christian Faith

Here is a brief article on the subject. https://christiananswers.net/islam.html

Here is a more in-depth article for those who want to know more: https://www.lausanne.org/content/lga/2017-05/christians-relate-muslims

Here is a helpful short article that gives us a little more insight into how Muslim people grieve so that we can better help our Muslim neighbours at this time http://blog.sevenponds.com/cultural-perspectives/customs-for-mourning-in-the-muslim-community

Exploring how we can cultivate better approaches to living in diversity

Longer term you might want to explore the concept of tolerance around religious and cultural differences through the lens of Scripture in which case The Youth Cartel have a great resource you can buy for a few dollars.  https://theyouthcartel.com/product/viva-tolerance/?fbclid=IwAR0otPCF21jH_ZzuUpUcGkAumbSfY8aSxJbARJ3R5pyJM7i30TjiPBJNDYw

I’m sure there are lots more excellent resources not listed here please feel free to post these below. The PYM team are here to assist you in any way. If you have any questions or would like some further support please do not hesitate to contact us.

Hōmai ki a mātou āianei he matauranga me aroha mā mātou mō tēnei rā.

Lord give us today the wisdom and love we need

I Love Taiwan Youth Exchange Programme 2019

26 June – 13 July 2019

PCANZ enjoys a warm partnership with the Presbyterian Church of Taiwan (PCT). Each year the PCT hosts a dynamic programme called I Love Taiwan, which attracts youth from all over the world, who share in the PCT’s youth and children’s ministry and learn about the unique culture of Taiwan.

vine at iltGlobal Mission supports applicants from PCANZ churches to attend this programme, which runs in Taiwanfrom June 26 – July 13. PCANZ applicants need to be at least 18 years old and require PCANZ endorsement to qualify for the $500 travel subsidy. Information about the programme is here,   The online application is here.

Once you receive your full application form from the PCT, email Global Mission Coordinator Phil King to request PCANZ endorsement and to apply for the travel subsidy, phil@presbyterian.org.nz.

The PCT deeply values their relationship with the PCANZ and looks to this programme to continue to develop the ecumenical partnership between our two churches.

This is a great opportunity for young adults from New Zealand to share in a vibrant programme of spiritual sharing, encouragement and cross-cultural learning.

 

You’re a gift Challenge

Life FM is partnering with churches and youth groups all throughout Aotearoa to show kindness and generosity this Christmas! Watch the video of Bjorn and Josh showing how it works, and if you want to take part, download the printable card and video to show your church and youth group from the Life FM website. Remember to tag Life FM, your church and the mates you’re challenging with your social media video upload!

Full info

GOD-talk Youth Leadership training videos

God-talk is an initiative of the ‘All Together’ team, initiated by Dave Mann and the Shining Lights Trust.

The resources have been created by a team of current and past youth leaders.

In the GOD-talk leadership video series, Youth leaders will be provided with 12 leadership-training video-tutorials (with discussion guides) on how to (i) build an outreaching culture, and (ii) how to attract crowds and facilitate some great programmes.

Leadership

Social Media Research, need volunteers

Do you use social media to connect with others?

Do you respond supportively to friends through social media?

Have you ever used social media to let people know that you need support?

We are interested in hearing from people between the ages of 16 and 21 about how social media can be used to provide support to young people experiencing emotional distress.

Take part in a WhatsApp digital interview and receive a $30 voucher.

If you are interested please email Kerry Gibson at kl.gibson@auckland.ac.nz or text her at 027 2185484

This research is being undertaken by Associate Professors Kerry Gibson and Susanna Trnka at the University of Auckland.

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 8 December 2017 for three years. Reference number 020441.

 

 

Youth Ministry in New Zealand Podcast

Jasmin and Tim are the hosts of the new fortnightly podcast, ‘Youth Ministry in New Zealand.’ Their vision to see everyone who workswith young people in Aotearoa equipped with relevant resources.

The Podcast aims to equip inspire and uplift all those working with young people in Aotearoa New Zealand. Each episode will include a conversation with those from around the country who work with young people in a variety of contexts.

Jasmin in a Presbyterian Youth Pastor working for the whole community of Marton. Tim is an Anglican Priest in the Rangitikei, with 10 years youth work experience.

They started this Podcast because they saw an opportunity to capitalise on the wealth of experience and wisdom in New Zealand. And a need to address our own unique context.

You can subscribe to the podcast by searching through your usual podcast app or

iTunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/nz/podcast/youth-ministry-in-new-zealand/id1439756211?mt=2

Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/episode/044a9l3f8aOalEyZsrKADl?si=Q7kd1hlXRM–Ubgy3EZ1UQ

Website:

Www.ymnewzealand.org

 

Example Podcast with our very own Matt Chamberlin:

PT Regional Youth Ministry Enabler for the Hawkes Bay/ Gisborne Region

Presbytery Central is seeking a Regional Youth Ministry Enabler for the Hawkes Bay/ Gisborne Region

The position is part time (8 flexihours per week), and the applicant would need to be based in the Hawkes Bay/ Gisborne region. The successful applicant will be part of a team of Regional Youth Ministry Facilitators charged with creating and developing an environment
where youth leaders in the Presbytery are nurtured, supported and assisted to build healthy
youth ministries, which offer young people the opportunity to grow their faith in God. Part
of the role is also to encourage and assist the development of new youth ministries in the
Presbytery.

more

Making a world-wide difference

They say the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree and that’s certainly the case for Jessie Boston, who worshiped at Wellington’s St John’s in the City Presbyterian Church for over a decade. The 26-year-old currently works for Tearfund in London, an evangelical international aid and development agency that “follows Jesus where the need is greatest”, says Jessie, the daughter of Professor Jonathan Boston (Professor of Public Policy at Victoria University) and Mary Hutchinson, a GP-turned-photographer who spent much of her medical career working with refugee patients.

“My parents chose careers that put others first, both from a theoretical and a practical perspective. Their focus has been on inequality, child poverty and climate change, as well as speaking out for those who don’t have a voice, which has definitely influenced me to do the same.”

While she’s always had a strong streak of social justice/activism, since moving to London two years ago Jessie has been become even more politically active, attending the Women’s March alongside thousands of others after President Trump’s inauguration, protesting outside Downing Street after Trump’s Muslim ban and against a weapons expo in the city last year.

“It’s an amazing feeling being with thousands of other people who feel the same as you, standing up for what you believe in,” she says.

Since living in London, Jessie has also become more focused on climate change and the way in which small, seemingly insignificant, lifestyle changes can make a difference.

“I became vegetarian and am now vegan, and I also make a conscious effort to cut out plastic as much as possible, from bags to packaging. Even making the smallest decision can make a difference.”

Jessie also credits her social activism to attending St John’s in the City from age 11 to 22, where she was involved in a range of church activities, including youth group and Easter camps, as well as attending Presbyterian Church ministry events such as PYM’s Going Further.

In 2013 she travelled to Myanmar where she attended Global Mission’s Going Global. “It was a fantastic experience,” she recalls. “Not only did it teach me about mission work but it also took me out of my comfort zone and taught me how to operate in situations that weren’t familiar to me.”

In fact, Jessie believes that taking responsibility in Presbyterian circles and stepping into leadership roles at a young age stood her in good stead for moving to London on her own.

“It definitely helped me to take a leap into the unknown and to know that everything is going to be okay. Having that Presbyterian Church experience has definitely shaped me into the person I am today.”

Jessie was born in the UK where her father was on sabbatical at Oxford University but grew up in Wellington. She originally considered a career in academia but realised her passions lay in the visual communications field. She completed a Bachelor of Visual Communication Design (Hons) at Massey University in 2015 and headed straight to London.

Jessie landed her current digital producer job at Tearfund not long after arriving, thrilled to have found an organisation that aligns not only with her social conscience but also her Christian values.

“When I arrived for my interview, they asked if they could pray for me, which put me at ease. It also made me realise that these were the kind of people I wanted to work for.”

Jessie now works in Tearfund’s digital team on their website and social media, along with other visual collateral for campaigns as varied as disaster relief and changing policy across the 50 countries the agency operates in.

“I love working for an organisation that has at its core such strong Christian values and whose current slogan is ‘We won’t stop until poverty stops’. This job allows me to use my skills but also help people, serve a purpose and serve God.”

While Jessie currently has no plans to return to New Zealand, she trusts that God will lead her where she is most needed. “I feel open to opportunities and going wherever the need is greatest. I’d encourage other young people to do the same if the opportunity arises for them. Pray about it and God will show you what to do.”

Sharon Stephenson

Spanz Spring 2018 (page 19)

Leprosy Mission Youth Advocate Scholarship 2019

A mission trip to Nepal in early 2019 – will you join the team?

The Leprosy Mission New Zealand’s Youth Advocate Scholarships enable students with a passion for overseas mission to experience our work, learn about the causes and consequences of leprosy, share time with people affected by leprosy and raise awareness and funding for Leprosy Mission projects.

In the past eight years the Leprosy Mission has organised a team who traveled to Kathmandu, Nepal. They will organise another team in 2019 to experience the continuing progress in the aftermath of the earthquakes on some of Nepal’s most vulnerable people – people affected by leprosy.

The past Youth Advocates have provided funding for vehicles and electricity generators that have been vital for the effective delivery of services at the Leprosy Mission’s Anandaban Hospital following the earthquakes. The hospital has managed a tide of crush injuries in makeshift wards and sending teams into the community to assess and attend to their needs.

Past Youth Advocates had this to say…

“Amazing trip that has included so much in a short time”

“The complete environment – place, people, experiences have all been perfect”

“My favourite was when we went into Anandaban Hospital and I got to spend time and take portraits of the patients, speaking to them with the little Nepali that I had. That was such an incredible experience!”

You now have an opportunity to be there and get involved.

Get in touch to say, “YES – I Am Interested”: katy.edwards@leprosymission.org.nz / 021 537 356 / 09 631 1806

Or download the application now Click here to download.

Connect 2018 Resources

Once again, we have been staggered by the post feedback we received from Connect 2018. We’ve been contacted a few times since Connect asking for some of the content used.

We have put together a folder that has content such as the epic Prayer stations from the Saturday night, the wording to the Mihi Whakatau including the grace, Abby’s mainstage prayers and a good number of the workshop handouts.

connect folder