Read Scriptures App

The Read Scriptures app has to be one of the best Bible apps around for encouraging young adults to read scripture on their own and see how the Bible is one large story that all flows together. It allows the reader to not only track where they are reading but it also breaks up the Bible in sections that we believe are very helpful to understand the larger story.

On top of that, each section has an intro video that’s extremely helpful and simple at the same time to help the reader understand more.

This app has been created from the folk behind the Bible Project, and you may well recognise some of the videos, as this Bible app has become an awesome home for all their videos.

We highly recommend this app for young people 15+

Screenshots

app1   app2

 

 

 

WOF Refresher Scenarios

We have had over 270 youth and children’s leaders complete our WOF training day. As part of your ongoing development, we ask that you sit down with your leadership teams and work through at least some of the scenarios listed below first citing any material from the WOF manual that may be relevant, then discussing what you would do and why.

 

  1. A 16-year-old confides in you that they are regularly smoking marijuana and occasionally P and pleads with you not to tell their parents… What would you do?
  2. You are considering running a hunting camp for teens which involves firearms. Using the Wof manual, what steps will you have to take to ensure this is a safe camp that parents will consent to their teens attending?
  3. You are a male leader asked to drive a van load of girls home after an evening activity because no female leaders have their full license.
  4. One of the young males in your youth group has begun to excessively hug one of the female leaders and you have noticed the hugs grow longer in time.
  5. It’s Friday night and youth groups about to start but this week we are driving off site to go bowling. You overhear some of your volunteer leaders chatting about their day. One of them who is also one of your drivers has just been out for an after work drink before youth group.
  6. One of your single female adult youth leaders lets you know that a 15-year-old boy in the youth group is being physically abused at home, and so he has moved into her flat to protect him from the violence.

Children’s and Youth Leaders Safety Warrant of Fitness Training

Keeping young people out of hospital and youth and children’s workers out of prison…

 ***Key leaders please pass this on to your teams***

 PYM and Kids Friendly are happy to announce this free warrant of fitness training days

21-23 July – @ Connect – Waikanae
12 Aug – Oamaru (Weston Community Church) – 9am-2:30pm (lunch provided by Synod)
16 Sept – Auckland (Ranui PIC) 9am-4pm
11 Nov – Christchurch (venue tbc) – 9:30am – 3:30pm

Cost: Free to people from Presbyterian or Uniting churches. $20 for others.

 The warrant of fitness training day encompasses vital training on the youth and children’s code of ethics and health and safety practices and is strongly recommended for all leaders working with children or youth.

 For more information on the WOF training please visit http://pym.org.nz/wof/

 Participants must attend the full day in order to receive the PCANZ WOF certificate.

Tips for studying the Bible (July is Bible Month)

July is Bible Month.

The Bible Society, as part of it’s Good for Life campaign, have released some great resources that might be useful for your youth ministry. They have some excellent testimony videos, Bible Studies, A Bible Summary, posters and a six month New Testament Reading Challenge which includes a completion certificate.

The Bible Society have also given these tips for studying the Bible.

Tips for studying the Bible

PRAY – ask God to help you understand what you’re about to read.

READ AND LISTEN – read the passage slowly and carefully. Think about the parts that stand out for you. Read those verses again.

THINK / REFLECT – ask yourself some questions:
• What’s the main point of the passage?
• What does it say about God? Does it say anything about
what God wants for me?
• Is there something I need to learn? Is there an example to follow, or a warning? Is God giving me a promise?
• How does God want me to respond in my thoughts, words and actions?

WRITE / JOURNAL – it’s also good to write down your thoughts and the verses that really stood out for you in a journal so you can look back on what you’ve learned.

PRAISE – thank God for his Word and what you’ve learned today. If you find your Bible hard to understand, have a look at some advice on finding an easier to read Bible.

GOD-Talk, a digital outreach-training resource

God-Talk is a digital outreach-training resource for youth and youth leaders. It includes free online video content, and is purposed to see young people throughout our nation talking about the Christian faith again.

Currently God-Talk currently has 5 video for training youth to share the Gospel.

Episode 1

Touch Pause Engage

In most monastic communities the monks would meet together to pray several times a day.  It was part of their every day life, and it would become a habit – something that happens without thinking.  No matter what they were doing at the time, gardening, preparing food, study… when the bell tolled they would “down tools” and head to the chapel.

Being together regularly formed authentic community.  Being together with God meant that they developed a sense of being with God throughout their day – their day was “punctuated” with reminders that God was intimately interested in them, invited them to be in relationship with Him, and to be part of what he was up to in the world.

What does that look like in 21st Century New Zealand?  We obviously do not live in the same kind of monastic community, and our daily lives are spent all over the place.  This activity is possibly a way to try and replicate the same kind of habit forming, connecting with each other and with God.  It may be that by stopping, pausing, and engaging with God regularly every day, after a few months we will carry with us a more constant sense of awareness of Gods presence.

“Touch Pause engage” comes from the way rugby scrums used to be led – and doesn’t mean much at all except a novel way of thinking about how we connect with God.

Can we use 21st social media, in this case Twitter, to send out a “bell” 3 times a day (7am, 12 midday and 6pm) to remind us to “pause and engage” with God?  The reminder will have a suggested prayer, or questions.  The suggested process is once you “hear the bell” you down tools, pause (count to 5 silently), breathe deeply, and read the prayer.  At the same time others from our wider faith community will be doing the same thing. No rules apply, as we don’t want this to result in any sense of obligation, guilt or failure – they are not Kingdom expectations. You are simply invited to join or not.  The prayers will be simple and short like “God please lead me today.”

A woman I read said once, prayer is simply being aware of God.  You don’t have to do anything, or say anything specific, but pause and engage.  The one liner may prompt you to say something else to God, or more importantly listen to what God might be saying to you at that time. Just the simple activity of stopping and breathing deeply is beneficial for your soul.

Interested? Then set yourself up on Twitter and “Follow TPE” – instructions below.

Instructions to receive via Text Message (2degrees and SPARK customers)

  1. TEXT 8987 ‘follow kiwichurch1’

Instructions to receive via Twitter

  1. Go to twitter.com
  2. Sign up (or log in if already a twitter user)
  3. Search for Kiwichurch1 and select ‘follow’

 

 

Liturgy Of The Cell Phones

Kara Root has put together this awesome liturgy to use in youth group or youth services when collecting and returning devices.

RELEASING PHONES

We surrender our phones
To acknowledge that we are not as essential
as we would have ourselves believe.
And to recognise how essential we are
to this moment, this conversation, this process.

We put down our phones
to put down the false belief
that we can be more places than here,
doing more things than this.
And to commit to being fully present, here and now.

We turn off our phones
to turn to each other and to the moment at hand,
with full attention, creativity and welcome.
May we receive the gifts of full presence and essential connection.
May God meet us in this moment.

Amen

 (phones are shut down and surrendered eg basket passed around and phones placed in them)

 

RETRIEVING PHONES

We return from this moment, taking with us the gift of being fully present.
May we return with gratitude and perspective
to the tasks before us and the noise around us,
a little more willing to resist the urgency
and a little more able to receive the quiet gifts of each moment
where God is present alongside us.

Amen.

(Cell phones are retrieved)

 

Copyright Kara Root

Shared with permission.

Christmas message from Moderator

Christmas: Giving presents, being present

Greetings

As much as we know that Christmas is not about presents, we also know that somehow presents are still a really good part of Christmas celebrations. To have something handed to you that someone else has bought or made with you in mind, and having thought about what might bring you some joy is – let’s face it – just really nice. And that sense of being considered is multiplied if the gift is something appropriate, something you really like and something which has clearly been given some thought. And there, for me at least, lies the rub.

In spite of the rampant consumerism presents may reflect, in spite of the risk of being seen as a cheap expression of our consideration for those we give them to, and in spite of the way they so often betray the lowly and humble origins of Christmas – presents are still a great way to remind others that they are important to us.

more

The Sound Fuse

View poster

The Sound Fuse summer camp is a clashing of faith, music and culture. It is designed to capture the feeling of a music festival, but with the “we’re in it together” focus of a missional task-force. It is a micro-microFestival. (That’s a new phrase.)

It is aimed at senior high-school students who want to make a difference in the world, who have a bent for creative expression, and who love (or are curious about) God. During this week together, we are looking to create those moments of deep connection where music + people + place all combine into something unique and meaningful… and we’ll be using the powerful creative capabilities of music and words to help lead us there. The questions we’re looking to answer is, how do I become the kind of person the world needs more of? and, how can I do that with style? 😉

Location: Tirohanga Camp, Dunedin, NZ

Dates: 17th-21st January, 2017

Cost: $350pp.

Age: 15+

Website: http://thesoundfuse.com/

Making social health available digitally

Because there’s a stigma to mental health/depression and getting help, there have been a number of kiwi mental health apps developed recently offering self-help for young people.

The data suggests people who go through the apps are more likely to seek personal help if they still need it, than those who haven’t used apps.

Some great apps include:

Aunty Dee

Aunty Dee is a free online tool for anyone who needs some help working through a problem or problems. It doesn’t matter what the problem is, you can use Aunty Dee to help you work it through.

Sparx

SPARX is a computer program that helps young people with mild to moderate depression. It can also help if you’re feeling anxious or stressed. It is aimed for 12-19 year olds, but that’s just a guide.

The Lowdown

Sometimes life’s ups and downs are more than just the usual ups and downs.
If you’re stuck feeling bad we’ll help you figure out if it could be anxiety or depression. Whatever’s going on you’ll find ideas and people who can help you get unstuck.